Learning to cook Indian food in Mumbai

Oh God, I love Naan! And my wife does too. I think this is an addiction, but I am afraid to seek medical help because I could not quit.

Fortunately, Indian food is quite popular in Poland, so we have a dependable supply of these delicacies. But it was always a mystery to me:

🤔 How is it possible that they are so delicious?

😋 Fortune favours the hungry

Fortunately, fate decided to help launch me on a fact-finding mission.

When we were roaming around Thailand, our company organized an event in India. Since we were reasonably close, we volunteered to help with the situation and visit Udaipur and Mumbai and enjoy the culture food.

And learn the secrets of the Naan.

👨🏽‍🏫 Naan-making class

On a trip to Paris, a few years ago, I have attended a croissant-making class. I highly recommend the experience, and I was on the lookout for similar fun since.

Somebody should tell Artur that these are not the Naan.

So, Naan being superior to Croissants, you would expect an even greater abundance of delicious learning opportunity in India, right?

Wrong! Cooking classes are very hard to come by in India!

blow your mind wow GIF by Product Hunt

How is that possible? Indian food is so Instagram-mable, delicious, hard to make, and popular that there should be no issue finding a cooking school. But there are none!

Fortunately, my Indian friends were kind enough to explain it to me in great detail.

What you went for a cooking class? Hahahahahahaha! You are so weird! Hahahahaha!

Kruti, my friend.

After the mockery was over, I learned that Indian people learn to cook from their mothers and grandmothers. There is 0 need for a cooking school because they will learn to make delicious Kadai, Kormas, and Naans at home.

As a side note, it is also quite accessible to hire a cook that will come to your house and cook you food for 2-3 days. In Europe and the US we are used to takeout, but in India, they approach this situation from precisely the opposite viewpoint.

You cook and learn to cook at home. Not at a cooking school.

Fortunately, I have used this thing called capitalism to find a cooking school in Mumbai (Click here for Chhabria Cooking Classes). After double-checking with the teacher that we indeed will be making Naan, we embarked to see the school.

Only to find out it was indeed someone’s home! A very enterprising Indian lady was running cooking classes for foreigners at her apartment. It was perfect because the kitchen had a very similar layout to ours, so we learned how to prepare delicious Indian dishes, Yes, including Naan.

Naan Recipe

Is remote work hurting the environment?

No, it does not. This is a clickbait title.

Remote work helps me see the world, contribute more to our products and lets me enjoy life to the fullest. From the stereotypical Thai Beach office to escaping open space, it’s a clear benefit for my employer and me.

Hard work

But what gets me most excited about remote work is the environmental impact. If people don’t have to move to big cities, they can stay in their home towns, close to friends and family. Outside of metropolis, it is possible to consume locally grown food, eradicating the need for transport and packaging of perishables.
With a smaller density, the housing can be cheaper, and living conditions improve considerably. People working remotely from areas like Kentucky, Idaho or Ukraine can spend their fat tech salaries locally, raising the living standards for the entire community, providing new jobs and example for future generations.
According to WWF, the commuters in the USA alone are generating 1786 metric tonnes of CO2. That is 26% of all US emissions that remote work can help curb.

But of course – there is an element of hypocrisy in that grand vision of remote work saving the environment.

Producing CO2 in Cape Town

I fly a few times a year to meet my coworkers in person, and air travel is a contributor to greenhouse emissions.

Haunted by this fact, I decided to count how much harm did I do. I added up my flights for each year:

  • 2016: 4.4 tonnes
  • 2017: 8.11 tonnes
  • 2018: 5.51 tonnes

That makes a total of 18.02metric tonnes of CO2 emitted due to me flying over the past three years. I do not feel happy about this, but I found a way to ease the impact of lugging my ass all over the world.

CarbonFootprint.com lets you contribute to carbon offsetting projects around the globe. Their air travel calculator will help you figure out how much harm did you do while getting these Instagram photos:


I decided to fund tree planting in Kenya since it will both plant trees and provide work for the local community. I happily shelled out 280 EUR to buy the land, plant trees and help them grow. The trees should consume 20 tonnes of CO2 caused by my air travel, helping me sleep better.

Carbon emissions due to flying is a downside of working for a globally distributed company, but I still can do something about it.
I also believe that long-term remote work can be the answer to the climate crisis we are experiencing right now.

The Garden Route – Cape Town Road Trip

For the past 3 years, my fiancée kept on telling me how amazing South Africa is. We’ve had an amazing road trip in western Canada together, spent a month jumping into Yucatan cenotes, and worked from the beaches of Thailand like proper remote employees, so I felt a little bit insulted. While we were enjoying these amazing places, she extolled the virtues of a city that has both the ocean and mountains, and teased me with waterfalls, wineyards and the perfect steak.

Fortunately, the opportunity has come to say “I call”.

Maria’s team had to gather in April for some on-site R&R in Cape Town. This is a traditional practice for remote employees. Since you see your coworkers only on Slack or Zoom calls – its good to remind yourself that these are real human beings that like to eat and have fun. And that was the plan for that trip – I would sit tight and work from fabulous Cape Town coffee shops and Maria would eat, drink and have fun with her coworkers.

Afterwards, we would go for a 6-day road trip.

Garden Route

We picked an 800 km long route on the coast, west of Cape Town. Known as the “Garden Route”, it is home to multiple national parks and charming coastal cities. This is where Atlantic and Indian oceans meet and nature decides to show us the good stuff.

1 🐘 Addo Elephant Park

Addo Elephant Park has “Elephant” in the name. Nuff said. These gracious creatures are impressive not only in size – you should read more on Maria’s blog.

This is the furthest point of our trip, so we decided to hit it first and to do most of the driving up front. Cape Town is 830 km from Addo, so we spent 2 days on the road, arriving at about 1 PM.

Our second night would be in the park itself. We scored a lovely “Cottage” on the park premises, which would allow us to take advantage of early morning animal spotting. The cottages are available on SAN parks website.

Addo Main Camp is located close to a waterhole, which you can observe from an underground hide. And… oh boy! That came in handy when a Lion (I had no intention of seeing a lion, but he showed up regardless) killed a Kudu antelope right next to the hide. We could all see him resting for a while before he dragged the prey away from our prying eyes.

I managed to record a video before he vanished:

The park itself is a DIY safari. You take your car and drive around, spotting different animals and enjoying life. Safari was #128 on my personal bucketlist and I can proudly cross it off having seen:

  • Wild Pig AKA Pumba
  • Kudu
  • Elephant
  • Zebra
  • Ostrich
  • Buffalo
  • Antelope
  • Different birds
  • Hiena
  • Jackal
  • Dung beetle. Lots of them! The biggest challenge in the park was not to crush them when they were crossing the road. I guess this is how elephants feel about us humans.
  • And the aforementioned Lion

2 ⛰ Storms River Mouth / Tsitsikamma

My sneaky fiancée lured me to this country promising waterfalls. I am kind of a Waterfall afficionado junkie, so visiting Storms River was a must.

Unfortunately, on the day both the weather turned bad and I started having ankle problems, so we gave up on waterfall hike (3-4 hrs) :(. We will have to do it another time.

3 🌊 Nature’s Valley

Even though you can sleep in the park itself (Storms River has cottages), we spent 2 nights in the nearby town called Nature’s Valley. The Otter Trail connects it to Storms River and apparently we are the only 2 people in the world that have not heard about The Otter Trail. Everything in Nature’s Valley is named after an Otter, and I mean EVERYTHING. We stayed at a placed called Kamma Otter and I counted at least 5 other B&Bs named after an Otter (and this city has only 50 houses). If you see how many times I used the word “Otter” in the last paragraph, you’ll start to get a feel of Nature’s Valley.

Believe it or not, an Otter-based naming scheme is not the only charming thing about the lovely town. It is located between the lagoon and the ocean, has 1 restaurant, 1 shop and a very tight-knit community of bird lovers.

I think they throw you out if you don’t love birds.

4 🥪 Knysna

The view was amazing and the eggs benedict even better.

Do you see the white building just on the edge of the left “head”? This is Easthead Cafe. We had breakfast there. You should too.

5 🚀 Map of Africa paragliding spot

Soaring in the air like a sack of potatoaes tied to a parachute!

On the way back to Cape Town, we decided to check out the spot called “Map of Africa”. It’s a piece of land shaped like an African continent, surrounded by river.

My fiancée had dreamt of paragliding for few years now (this trip is all about the stuff she wants to do, isn’t it?). Every time we noticed people in the air, she would point them out and make sure I knew she is up for it 🙂

And there they were, running from the cliff and soaring in the air!

So how does this work?

  1. You drive to the “Map of Africa” viewpoint, expecting to see something vaguely resembling African continent,
  2. A random guy walks up to you, offering to strap you onto a contraption that puts you a hundred meters in the air. No reservation was necessary,
  3. Naturally, you say yes to the random dude,
  4. You pay 800 ZAR per person,
  5. This is a tandem flight so you are actually tied to an instructor who hopefully knows what he is doing,
  6. You run awkwardly a few steps,
  7. You start soaring like a sack of potatoes,
  8. You fly for about 15-20 minutes having the best time ever,
  9. If the instructor catches a wind current, you land where you started, with smooth grass and sheep to soften your fall. If not, he will drop you in the ocean land on the beach and they’ll pick you up in a car.

6 🌉 Kaaimans Bridge

While paragliding, you can get a glimpse of this decommissioned railway bridge. If you are not paragliding, you can stop at “The Dolphins Viewpoint” to have a look:

7 🐐 The Oude Post

This is a gas station and a sandwich shop. Which has Mini Goats, a turtle and the most delicious sandwiches imaginable. They serve traditional Roosterkoeken – a sandwich/pastry that is baked on the barbecue during traditional Braai.

Braai is to South Africa what Barbecue is to Texas. A human right.

8 🐳 Hermanus

Our trip had an end right on the airport, where we would return the car. But since we had extra few hours, we stopped in Hermanus.

Hermanus is a coastal city that is famous for one thing: Whales.

It is one of the best cities in the world for Whale Watching. The cliff offers great views on the ocean and these big sea mammals come close by so you can watch them from the shore.

The season is from July till November, so a whale watching trip in April was a bit of a gamble, but it paid of tremendously! A whale was doing whale things in the bay and standing on Gearings Point, we could see the back and tail popping up from the water here and there.

I tried to take drone photos, but birds attacked my drone, so I had to count on the return-to-home feature.

🗺 Map

Here are all these spots – and more on the map:

I have to admit that now I understand why my fiancée wanted to share immense beauty of South Africa with me. I will definitely come back here. I the meantime – you can check out Job’s post with much better photos. Or subscribe to my newsletter!

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Swimming with Seals in Cape Town

YES. You can swim with Seals (not the Navy kind) in Cape Town, South Africa. These gracious creatures are very playful, and they don’t hesitate to swim up close, say Hi or maybe do a high five (fin).

A Bit of Backstory:

In April 2019, my Fiancee (who also works remotely) had to go for a business trip to Cape Town. Since we all work in different places, our company flies the whole team to one place for a week, so we can get together and dose up on some in-person interaction. Since 3 of Maria’s teammates live in Cape Town, I was hoping that someday she would have to go there and finally they decided to do so.
Being shameless opportunists that we are, we jumped at the chance to spend some time in South Africa. Nature is fantastic here, people friendly and ocean cold. Real cold.
Maria was spending days with her coworkers, and I was working from the city’s amazing coffee shops and researching what could we do after her business was over.
During that research, I stumbled upon a Casey Neistat’s video where he went swimming with sharks seals.

This is the best stuff ever!

I know, right? Who does not want to swim with sea dogs?!

Since famous bloggers think alike, I went with the same company Casey did – the Animal Ocean.
They run an environmentally conscious operation, and they make sure the seals are fairly treated and allowed to unionize.

So here is roughly what happpens:

  1. You book your trip like 5 days in advance. They sell out fast
  2. You arrive on time to Houts Bay. We were scheduled at 11:30
  3. Park your car there, they are looking after it
  4. Sign paperwork, check out amazing shark socks
  5. You squeeze into wetsuit, you get a vest and one-piece suit with vest
  6. You put on wetsuit again since you confused the sides. ZIPPER AT THE FRONT!!
  7. You can rent a gopro if that’s your jam
  8. Leave all other stuff at their shop
  9. You go to the bay in a SealMobile!
  10. Ride in a speedboat to Duniker island
  11. Now you get gloves and masks
  12. You play with seals which is the best experience of your entire life
  13. After about 1 hour, you are so cold that you really want to go back on the boat (and life)
  14. They pour hot water inside your suit to make you less cold
  15. They give you hot chocolate – guess why .
  16. Speedboat and sealmobile back to the shop!
  17. You wear a cute seal hoodie while you get warm. Also probably a shower.

Want to know more about the seals?

These particular seals are known as “Cape Fur” seals. They hang out in Duniker island in Houts bay because:

  • Island is not connected to the land, so humans are not bothering them too much
  • There is plenty of food. They like Mantis Shrimp
  • They ocean has good temperature
  • Sharks (pretty common predator in South Africa) stay away from Houts Bay.

Check out this article by Animal Ocean if you want more reliable information about the seals.

Cheap ski weekend in Zurich. How much is it?

In February I found myself in Zurich.
You know, the go-to destination for cheap travel.

One of the advantages of remote work is that I don’t need to take time off to enjoy another part of the world. I can work somewhere and just take in the local culture, food and experience the change of scenery. I can pick a cheap flight at an unpopular hour and have a regular workday without skipping a beat.

My Fiancee was in Costa Rica at this time, so I decided to visit my friends in Switzerland. Not that I needed an excuse – Switzerland is a gorgeous country that has the things I love the most: mountains, forests, lakes, and waterfalls.


But since we spent last winter in Thailand and India, my main focus was to get a chance to practice my amazing snowboarding skills.

By amazing I mean perfectly average.

During the weekend I would ski, and on the workdays, I would roam around the city, have a nice walk and work from their home, maybe a coffee shop. Or a fondue parlor, since what you really need on your keyboard is not crumbs nor spilled coffee, but melted cheese.

OH MY GOD, THERE IS SO MUCH CHEESE HERE.

Me.

All this is cheese.
Just kidding. It’s cocaine.

Yes, this is a pot of cheese. You know that French trick where they put a little cheese in your soup? The do the same in Switzerland. Minus the soup.

🧀 Ok, enough about cheese.

There are plenty of ski areas nearby, so we decided on the closest one.

Here is the guide to Zurich Ski areas



🏔️ Flumserberg


Flumserberg is the easiest one to get to. The train from Zurich HB takes 1 hour to get there, and the lift starts 20 meters from the train station.
Swiss locals come into the train wearing their ski boots and with the gear on. It is perfect for a 1-day or a weekend trip.


It is also gorgeous. The city of Unterterzen is by the lake, surrounded by almost vertical walls of Fjord-like peaks

We came here with a 7am train, arriving at 8am and returned on Sunday at 5pm and were at Zurich HB at 6PM.

💳 Ski Passes

Swiss rail runs a special promo that gives you:

  • 10% reduction on the 1-, 2- or 6-day ski pass for the entire Flumserberg region.
  • Free baggage transport for the outward and return journeys worth CHF 12 each.
  • 15% reduction at Intersport Rent.


You cannot purchase it online though. You have to use a machine at the station.
Here are the details

I paid 156,80 for a 2-day ski pass and transport to Flumserberg and back.
Once you arrive in Flums, you have to exchange the coupon from SBB into the actual ski pass at the counter.


🏨 Juhui Flumserberg:

Theoretically, on these 2-day tickets, we could have gone back to our place in Zurich on Saturday evening and return Sunday morning. But since Switzerland is such a cheap country, we decided to live like kings and splurge on accommodation.
Which means that we got the cheapest option available on Booking and we stayed overnight.
And what a fantastic decision it was! We got to sleep in a 120-year old wooden hotel.

Don’t get me wrong, restrooms were not in the room, and it was very cramped, but we passed out almost immediately anyway.
We got sheets, towels and a big breakfast with fantastic views. We were happy.
We paid 149 CHF (including beers) for 2 people in a 4-person room. I would be very surprised if in 4 people would indeed fit there comfortably.
But it was 74 CHF after splitting between 2 people.

🎿 Rental

I had my Snowboard boots with me, but I had to rent the Snowboard and a helmet.
The passes from SBB should have given us a 15% discount on Intersport rental. But because of a misunderstanding with our friends, we rented in a place just by the gondola.
I paid 101 CHF for a helmet and a snowboard for 2 days.
My friend paid 65 for skis + boots etc., for 1 day.

✈️ Flights

I have Star Alliance Gold status, which entitles me to a piece of free luggage on all star alliance flights except „light” tariffs on Lufthansa and Swiss. But I found a cheap ticket on LOT (PL national airline, Star Alliance), also in the „light” pricing.
But because of my Star Alliance status – I got luggage for my snowboard shoes and drone for free.
Zurich is a peculiar place. It is a place of employment many expats, and they want to fly home for the weekend. Which means that if you come here FOR the weekend, you pay less.
I arrived Saturday morning and flew back Sunday. I paid about 55 CHF for all of that.

If you want to read some tips on how to get to Star Alliance Gold cheaper and faster – do sign up! 👇

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💰 Totals


So there you have it. I paid 331 CHF for the whole trip. If you want to include the flight to Zurich, that is an additional 55 CHF. So for 380 CHF, you can enjoy a weekend of skiing in Swiss Alps.
But then again, if you want it to be cheaper, then you probably should not choose Switzerland. 🙂


And here is Michał who organized all of this. Thanks Michał!


Richelieu Rock – Thailand’s scuba paradise

Remote work has it’s own set of cultural stereotypes. On one hand, there is “Work from home”.

Put your pants in the bottom drawer, because you won’t need them anymore. Now you will work from home and never again will you have contact with a human being.

Barracuda is your only friend now. Barracuda does not judge nor wears pants.

The second end of the spectrum is full-on digital nomad. Someone who has all belongings packed in a carry-on bag and travels the world perpetually living in hostels and airbnbs.

And… Of course is working from a beach in Thailand.

Thailand comes up a lot while mentioning remote work. And for a good reason.

  • It’s cheap
  • Chiang Mai or Bangkok enjoy a bustling tech scene
  • People there are very friendly
  • Food is amazing
  • The nature is spectacular
  • But the beaches out of this world!

So we decided to give it a go. The only downside is that… I hate beaches. Literally, I would rather be anywhere else that on the beach.

This is hell

Diving in Thailand

Fortunately, Thailand has more to offer than those menacing sandy beaches and annoying gentle waves.

It has some great diving. In fact, the diving is so great that we practiced in 2C ( 35.6 F ) water in Poland just to finish our scuba certifications before coming here. This is a story for another post, but I will mention this while I have a chance: DO NOT DIVE IN 2C ( 35.6 F ) WATER.

For our Thai diving, we were interested in Ko Tao. This is a whole island famous for quick & cheap diving certifications located on the bay side of peninsula. But it turns out, that the best diving spots are on the Andaman sea! Places like:

  • Similan Islands
  • Surin Islands
  • Hin Daeng and Hin Muang
  • Famous Ko Phi Phi featured in the movie “The Beach” (with that title it’s rightly a Thriller if you ask me)
  • And Richelieu Rock

Richelieu Rock

Richelieu Rock is considered a #8 best diving spot in the world. It is a vertical limestone pinnacle just barely touching the surface. It looks very unassuming, but under the water… It’s a magnificent experience.


We booked a trip from Khao Lak explorer and our dive master was Matt Waters from Nomadic Scuba. An amazing and friendly man who took the photos you see above.

He also brought our attention to the debate regarding the naming.

Richelieu Rock was discovered by Jacques Cousteau – a relentless oceanographer. Some say that the purple reefs reminded him of the colors of Cardinal Richelieu’s robes. Matt says that the name comes from General Richeliu, a Danish officer who became an admiral of Royal Thai Navy.

Regardless of etymology, Richelieu Rock is worth a visit. Khao Lak is a good home base, but Phuket has ships coming to Richelieu Rock as well.

Thailand is not only Bangkok, beaches and booze. It’s Barracudas as well.